Updates from QA Training

Hello IE10, we’ve been expecting you!

The launch of Windows 8 saw the arrival of Internet Explorer 10 and with it the true dawn of the HTML5 age. With Microsoft’s excellent implementation of the core HTML5 and CSS3 functionality we have arrived at a point in web development where the current release of every major web browser is HTML5 ready.


David Walker | 7 December 2012

The launch of Windows 8 saw the arrival of Internet Explorer 10 and with it the true dawn of the HTML5 age. With Microsoft’s excellent implementation of the core HTML5 and CSS3 functionality we have arrived at a point in web development where the current release of every major web browser is HTML5 ready.

This ground-breaking moment means as a web developer I can begin to look at my beloved HTML5 as the norm and not the bleeding edge it was when I tentatively wrote my first <section> tag two years ago. It means the original WHATWG standard is now mostly accepted in browsers, although not all features are W3 Recommendations yet.

It is also part of the big Microsoft Windows 8 plan to rehabilitate themselves and bad practices they gave rise to on the web. Yes IE did suck, Microsoft recognize this and no amount of bombastic adverts in the Cinema telling us IE9 was the future of the web can ever take away from the cry "IE SUCKS!" because, well...it did terribly! I could give you a hundred examples of the issues but Microsoft have realised how bad their rep was.

Funny as this is, well funny for web geeks anyway, the unfortunate legacy issues of IE will be with us for a significant time to come. A developer needs a Bond-like bag of tricks and gadgets to get IE6,7,8 and in some cases 9 to be the browsers you want them to be -  the terrific IE10's parents to work with the modern semantic web. Javascript libraries like Modernizr and rock solid HTML and CSS normalization templates like H5PB give you a base for development.

From the outside designers get very frustrated that organisations do not upgrade to the most recent version of a browser as soon as it is released. The problem is, many of these old browser issues have been hacked around over many years to get an intranet to work. Plus if you are still on XP as your corporate OS then you can't upgrade past IE8 and that means unless a developer is willing to support you (they should but time constraints and budgets cause some key issues). Organisations with robust security policies based over multiple locations cannot upgrade and cannot allow an alternative browser like Firefox or Chrome because they don't play ball with the Active Directory security model in quite the same way.

Despite my previous paragraph listing all the IE issues, Microsoft are now offering great hope for the future. Microsoft know that to keep us in their development eco-culture and to build websites for the multiplatform and multi device reality of today's corporate and domestic web they needed to enable the new .NET 4.5 framework and the Windows 8 environment with these technologies at hand. To the point where Windows 8 Store apps for Desktop and Mobile can be built entirely using HTML5, Javascript and CSS and run as an app on your desktop, tablet or phone device. They've decoupled Sharepoint from the tightly bound ASP.NET world of the past to embrace this future and they've recognised that if you're going to use their ASP.NET MVC approach then the XHTML web dev skills of 1999 won't cut it in 2013.

IE10 is here, and with it so is the new age of HTML5. We can wish goodbye to Flash, browser specific error, using alert statements to debug our javascript and the notion that IE SUCKS! IE10 is every bit as good as Chrome and Firefox. We just need to get the rest of the world to see it!


David-Walker---sq

David Walker

Head of Emerging Technologies

David is a change driven technologist who continually looks to adapt and expand his knowledge and understanding of his field. Over the least eighteen years David has led technology and training companies through emerging fields and technology trends helping them to understand the future and develop business opportunities. As Head of Emerging Technologies he works closely with customers and industry experts to ensure the opportunities and threats of new technology trends designing custom learning solutions to help small and enterprise organisation adapt and make the most of their people - ensuring QA is ready when our customers need to navigate the minefield of the fast moving digital landscape. His passion is in advanced web engineering principals and vendor neutral thick client design/development technologies reflected in his research, analysis and courseware development experience combined with his training delivery skills. As a technologist he is the lead instructor and syllabus author for web development technologies and specialising in Agile, DevOps, and User Experience driven approaches to developing solutions. He has authored courses such as HTML5, Responsive Web Development, User Experience, NodeJS, Javascript and jQuery.
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