Today’s businesses face a turbulent environment in which constant economic, regulatory and technological disruption has become the norm. Businesses need flexible, adaptable architectures which can accommodate change but also continue to deliver satisfactorily in ‘Business as Usual’ (BaU).

Business Architecture as a practice is concerning with leading the way in defining a target operating model, and then helping the business to realise that model over time, all based around the enterprise’s mission and strategic goals. A Business Architecture blueprint is derived by first understanding the enterprise’s Business Model, as communicated by the leadership team. Business Architecture must also pay attention to any external factors, such as governance requirements deriving from legislation and the regulatory authorities. The architects then need to consider what capabilities are required to deliver the Business Model, and how these capabilities can be linked up into value streams for stakeholders. The blueprint is completed by moving on to consider how capabilities will be realised, through appropriate business systems with their people, process and technology components.

The course that we offer takes the delegate through the process of deriving a Business Architecture blueprint, explaining the components required, and suggesting techniques, models and tools that assist with the process. We also show how eventually these components can be connected to IS/IT services.

The approach taken is loosely aligned to the TOGAF and Archimate standards, but this is not intended to be a formal course on either framework. No knowledge of these frameworks is required, although it would be desirable.

Target Audience:

The course would benefit delegates already qualified in TOGAF and/or Archimate, or in some other EA framework, for example Zachman. The course would benefit Enterprise Architects, Business Architects and also Business Analysts and Senior Business Analysts looking to move into an architectural role. The course would also suit the awareness needs of roles such as Programme Manager, and similar roles involved in the Change and Transformation environment.

There are no prerequisites, although knowledge of an Enterprise Architecture Framework (TOGAF, Archimate, Zachman etc.) would be beneficial, as would any knowledge of, or experience with, strategic planning and implementation processes.

The course uses practical exercises, scenarios and a case study to illustrate and rehearse the topics included in the subject matter material. Delegates will learn to:

  • Discuss the place of Business Architecture in the context of Enterprise Architecture and strategic planning for the enterprise.
  • Explain the need for metamodels of Business Architecture and a repository. Recognise the components of some standard metamodels of Business Architecture.
  • Appreciate the options for situating a Business Architecture practice within a modern enterprise.
  • Describe the components of a Business Motivation and Governance hierarchy.
  • Describe the components of a Business Model, based on the Business Model Canvas.
  • Describe the meaning of a Value Proposition, explain and distinguish the elements that make up models of value.
  • Distinguish between a Business Model and an Operating Model. Understand the purpose and generic structure of these models.
  • Understand how to design the Operating Model based on the Business Model, using activity modelling as a basis for this.
  • Explain the meaning of capability. Apply techniques to identify capabilities. Describe a Capability Map (Business Anchor Model). Describe the dimensions and elements of business systems that realise business capabilities.
  • Discuss the importance of stakeholder engagement in Business Architecture. Recognise techniques to identify and analyse stakeholders.
  • Discuss the meaning and role of Business Functions in a Business Architecture.
  • Explain the meaning of Value Streams and their relationship with the Value Chain. Understand the relationship between Value Streams and capabilities.
  • Discuss the need for Capability-based Planning. Recognise the elements of a strategic roadmap.
  • Explain the role of processes in a Business Architecture.
  • Explain the role of information in a Business Architecture.
  • Explain the role of services in a service-orientated style of Business Architecture.
  • Recognise the need for a view of the physical components of a Business Architecture. Explain the relationship between Structure and Behaviour in an architecture.
  • Recognise the need for a socio-cultural view of Business Architecture, and appreciate some of the elements involved in documenting this.
  • Appreciate what the BIZBOK has to offer.
  • Course Introduction
  • Context and Content of Business Architecture
  • Motivation and Governance
  • Activities, Capabilities and Value Streams
  • Process, Information and Business Services
  • Physical Structure and Socio-cultural aspects
  • Overview of BIZBOK