Updates from QA Training

Windows 8 Mobile

Yesterday I warned you Microsoft had a plan and as I sit with my Coffee this wet and windy summer morning they have been good enough to prove me right with the announcement of Windows Mobile 8 and like Surface on Tuesday it is a game changer.


David Walker | 21 June 2012

Yesterday I warned you Microsoft had a plan and as I sit with my Coffee this wet and windy summer morning they have been good enough to prove me right with the announcement of Windows Mobile 8 and like Surface on Tuesday it is a game changer.

Yesterday I warned you Microsoft had a plan and as I sit with my Coffee this wet and windy summer morning they have been good enough to prove me right with the announcement of Windows Mobile 8 and like Surface on Tuesday it is a game changer.

Built on the same core code as the desktop environment this gives Microsoft a solid integrated OS. As a developer this makes me VERY happy. If you get to grip with Metro UI apps (which can be written in javascript as well you know!) and I can write for tablet, mobile and desktop as native app. Learn the design aesthetic and I can carry that into my ASP.NET Web Form and MVC architecture. This is as ground breaking as the .NET framework was over a decade ago and sets the framework for Microsoft development in the next decade.

Bad news first - no existing Windows phone running 7.x will be able to run Windows 8 Mobile. They are going to be upgrading the 7.x OS to 7.8 but its journey ends there. I have no idea how this going to affect Nokia and their relationship with Microsoft yet but the struggling telephony giant is now in possession of the most amazing new line of smart phones that are looking to be White Elephants (still amazing White Elephants and if you have a choice between an Android 2.x phone or a Windows 7.x mobile don't chose the green robot)

This does not surprise me in the slightest. As a long term MS developer I have often felt like part of the world's biggest beta community. MS throw out a lot of new technology and with big kid eyes ask 'Do you like it? Shall we do more?' When we say yes they hit the ground had and fast often leaving the first iteration of a technology behind like bad sixth form poetry  (CardSpace? The Zune?)

This is without a doubt the right decision for MS to make in the long-term survival and strategy of the Metro platform. You just need to take a look at the fragmentation of the Android environment to see why this holds people back

I ask this every time I teach my HTML5 course, do you have a smart phone, do you know what version it is on. Few, very few, Android handset owners have Ice-cream Sandwich installed. Most have a 2.x flavour. Let me put this in context: This is the majority of users are on XP when Windows 7 is the most up-to-date environment. As a developer that is terribly frustrating because you want that Windows 7 experience and you have to neuter your ambitions.

On the positive The Windows 8 start screen looks amazing and in now way tries to look like an iDevice or Android clone and is going to be built with a Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 at its heart. Every Windows 8 phone will be updateable over the air and that will get 18 months of firmware updates of Firmware support. That offer, if it can be maintained, is amazing as neither Apple and Android do not offer that assurance and more than one Android owner has been frustrated in buying a piece of kit that was already obsolete.

The most interesting development over the next few months is to see how hardware partners line up for the phone. Building a device for Windows is much more controlled and less laissez-faire than the Android licence. With the Surface Microsoft stepped into hardware manufacture as well as being the software provider that it has always been. It means that any company wanting to produce a tablet with Windows 8 Mobile is not just licencing the software but also competing with Microsoft directly for market share.

Will they take the same route on phones? Is a buy up of Nokia around the corner or do the two companies futures become even more deeply intertwined? I cannot begin to tell you how techcited I am to find out!


David-Walker---sq

David Walker

Head of Emerging Technologies

David is a change driven technologist who continually looks to adapt and expand his knowledge and understanding of his field. Over the least eighteen years David has led technology and training companies through emerging fields and technology trends helping them to understand the future and develop business opportunities. As Head of Emerging Technologies he works closely with customers and industry experts to ensure the opportunities and threats of new technology trends designing custom learning solutions to help small and enterprise organisation adapt and make the most of their people - ensuring QA is ready when our customers need to navigate the minefield of the fast moving digital landscape. His passion is in advanced web engineering principals and vendor neutral thick client design/development technologies reflected in his research, analysis and courseware development experience combined with his training delivery skills. As a technologist he is the lead instructor and syllabus author for web development technologies and specialising in Agile, DevOps, and User Experience driven approaches to developing solutions. He has authored courses such as HTML5, Responsive Web Development, User Experience, NodeJS, Javascript and jQuery.
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