Updates from QA Training

Using an IPv6 address in a UNC name

With the world being dragged kicking and screaming towards IPv6, (and I think the world is winning), a senior colleague (Steven Ashworth) posed an interesting question last week. How do you (if you can), use an IPv6 address within a UNC name.


Paul Gregory | 27 February 2012

With the world being dragged kicking and screaming towards IPv6, (and I think the world is winning), a senior colleague (Steven Ashworth) posed an interesting question last week. How do you (if you can), use an IPv6 address within a UNC name.

As I am sure you are all aware IPv4 addresses can be used in a UNC name instead of using a host name when connecting to a resource, for example\\10.10.0.101\PublicData One of the challenges is here is that IPv6 addresses are colon separated hexadecimal, (rather than dotted decimal for IPv4), and the colon is an illegal character within a UNC name. When connecting to a resource via a UNC name with an IPv6 address there are three basic rules:

  1. Replace each colon with a hyphen. If the double colon syntax is used then use a double hyphen. For example:
    2001:abcd::1234:0001 would be 2001-abcd--1234-0001
  2. Apply the suffix of .ipv6-literal.net - for example:
    2001-abcd--1234-0001.ipv6-literal.net
  3. In some instances, especially if using link-local address (fe80) if the Index ID needs to be specified, (the % followed by a number at the end), the percent sign is replaced with the letter s. For example:
    fe80::2814:24b4:53ee:ed59%22 would be fe80--2814-24b4-53ee-ed59s22.ipv6-literal.net

Another place that IPv6 addresses might start to appear will be in the address bar of your favourite web browser. As the colon is a reserved within a URI address. In this instance the IPv6 address needs to be enclosed in square brackets [] for example http://[2001:abcd::0001]. Be careful some web browsers only partially support this syntax. They will let you enter the address and connect through to the web page but will then remove the square brackets and therefore subsequent requests will fail.

Updated 1/3/12 - seems word removes the double hypens. Thank you to Ian Button of Calderdale for spotting that.


QA Training | Paul Gregory

Paul Gregory

Head of Microsoft Infrastructure

A Microsoft Certified Trainer since 1995, Paul has worked both for and with some of the world's leading IT Services organisations – including Unisys, Dell and Microsoft during the Microsoft Windows (TAP) Technology Adoption Programme. Paul specializes in delivering training around the Windows Operating system as well infrastructure and management solutions around System Center going right back to SMS 1.0. Paul is a frequent visitor to Microsoft's Global Headquarters in Seattle to attend early product workshops and for many years has delivered training courses around the world on behalf of Microsoft. In addition to being actively involved in Microsoft's Windows TAP programme, Paul has recently delivered both Microsoft's Private Cloud 2012 readiness training to partners in the UK and was a member of the Microsoft global training team delivering Windows Server 2012 early adopter training. During recent years Microsoft has requested Paul to deliver System Center training at both Redmond and The South American head office to Microsoft Partners.
Talk to our learning experts

Talk to our team of learning experts

Every business has different learning needs. QA has over 30 years of experience in combining the highest quality training with the most comprehensive range of learning services, ensuring the very best fit for your organisation.

Get in touch with our learning experts to talk about how we can help.